• Share Reports Like Performance Charts

    I’ve spent the last couple weeks working on a new feature in CMS 1.6 that allows you to create, edit and save reports just like performance charts, documents and other items in the system. This feature can save a ton of time because now reports don’t have to be rewritten if a new user wants to see them or if the dates for the report change.

    In the past, the only way to save a copy of a report was to save it to your bookmarks. This worked great for the person who created the report, but it was impossible to share that report with other people on the team without recreating it for each user. Now you can create a report once, and it will be available to everyone on your team under the reports tab.

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  • New Options for Date Range Selection

    How often do you run a report for a periodic set of data? Most applications allow you to enter a fixed period of data with specific dates to report on. Some will let you say things like "show me the last month's data", but even those tend to save the results based on that fixed time span. We understand how frustrating it is to constantly update your settings for a report to get the results that matter today and have done something about it.

    Relative Reporting Dates

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  • A couple days ago I talked about how we made Corporate Management Suite 1.5 easier to use by moving the Organization and Date selectors to the upper left hand corner. It was a great start, but we didn't stop there.

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  • We're constantly refining the user interface of our Corporate Management Suite software based on feedback from our customers, but the changes in version 1.5 are particularly noteworthy. The first ones I'm going to focus on are the Organization and Calendar Period selectors.

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  • With the wonderful implementations of AJAX, many people (myself included) tend to look first within libraries like Dojo when trying to implement a client-side solution. While this is generally a good approach, one thing that some developers tend to forget is the intrinsic events like onkeypress, onmouseout, etc.

    A good example is the textarea tag. It doesn't have any limit on the number of characters like the input tag, so it's a great candidate for a simple JavaScript function to duplicate the maxlength functionality. The initial instinct when coding something to handle this is to check the length of the field and return a false if it's reached the limit. This does indeed limit the size, but there's one problem; backspace and delete trigger onkeypress. As a result, if you're at the limit and try to delete characters, it returns false and nothing happens! Instead, I find the best solution is to truncate the field if the size is reached. For example, to limit a textarea to 255 characters:

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